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FAQ and Help

Q: What Age Group will my son/daughter play in this year (2014)?

ONTARIO BOX & FIELD LACROSSE

Year of Birth Division
2008-2011

Peanut/Paperweight

2006-2007

Tyke
2004-2005 Novice
2002-2003 PeeWee
2000-2001 Bantam
1998-1999 Midget
1993-1997 Intermediate

 

US FIELD LACROSSE

U-15 - Grade 9/10

U-13 - Grade 6/7/8

U-11 - -Grade 4/5/6


Q: My son/daughter has never played before? Is it difficult to learn?He/she is older, is it too late to start the game?


A: Not really and it depends. At the younger ages, a willingness to learn and to run is important. The most important thing to ensure an enjoyable on-floor experience for your child is for you, as the parent to get a stick as well and play catch with your son and daughter for 10-15 minutes a day. After 2-3 weeks you will be amazed at how much more fun the practices and games will be for him/her.
It is never too late to start to play. As long as the player is willing to run (and make an effort), no age is too old. Given some effort playing catch with a parent or friend or even tossing the ball against a convenient building wall, you can pick up enough passing/catching/shooting techniques to get by


Q: What equipment is needed for lacrosse?

A: The Ontario Lacrosse Association has put out a beginner's guide to Lacrosse in Ontario and the equipment pages are still valid. See document below for a detailed equipment and player/parent guide, an interesting read for anyone.


Why should my son/daughter play lacrosse?

  • Lacrosse is Canada's National game.  It's the fastest game on two feet!
  • It's a safe sport!  Sports Canada ranks it at 54th on the list of sports that can cause an injury.  In other words there are 53 other sports that you will be more likely to get injured playing.  Can you name 50 sports?!
  • It's a great physical conditioner.  Running speed and stamina are well rewarded in the game of lacrosse!
  • It develops agility and good hand/eye co-ordination.
  • Develops discipline over emotion.
  • Hockey scholarships are tough to get with so many players, but box lacrosse players from Canada are at a premium in the U.S.
  • 380 Colleges and Universities in the U.S. offer a men's lacrosse program and 195 offer a women's program.
  • Hockey coaches say they can identify a lacrosse player in their midst.  Tenacious, fearless and tough - with really soft hands.  Their ability to handle traffic in front of the net sets them apart from other players.

Anyone serious about hockey should play lacrosse

 
From Gretzky to Tavares, Shanahan to Stamkos, Canadian-born NHLers recommend playing lacrosse in the summer to improve hockey skills.
“It’s lacrosse that helped teach me to spin off checks, take shots and protect the puck under pressure. My stick skills, the way to read the play quickly comes from lacrosse. The hand-eye coordination, is just one of the little things that helps you in hockey.”
—John Tavares, two-time World Junior Hockey Champion
“I couldn’t wait for hockey season to end so I could pick up a lacrosse stick again.”
—Wayne Gretzky
Hockey and lacrosse are very similar sports.
Both hockey and lacrosse are high tempo, physical team sports that have similar elements to the game. Both sports utilize 5 players and a goalie, three periods and strategy of developing odd-man situations to create scoring opportunities. Hockey players excel in Lacrosse. And, in turn, they become markedly better hockey players.
Comparatively, lacrosse is a much less expensive sport than hockey and uses much of the same protective upper body equipment.
Hockey players benefit from lacrosse by developing:
  • develops stick handling creativity
  • develops creativity in tight areas
  • reading the play offensively
  • develops strong, dynamic defensive tactics
  • builds up strength and endurance
  • helps prevent sport burn-out by playing a new, fast-paced sport
  • increases hand-eye coordination
  • teaches players to play with their head up and to be more aware of their surroundings
  • reinforces the importance of quickness and agility around the net
  • builds self esteem, respect, integrity and fairness
  • teaches leadership skills
  • learn to play both offensive and defensive positions and make a quick transition from defense to offence and vice versa
  • scoring skills are honed by shooting at smaller targets and picking corners
  • teaches the creativity of fakes, back passes and shots
  • develop the use of both hands
Here is a short list of famous hockey players who benefited from playing lacrosse:
  • Wayne Gretzky
  • Steven Stamkos
  • John Tavares
  • Brendan Shanahan
  • Gary Roberts
  • Paul Kariya
  • Kyle Turris
  • Gordie Howe
  • Bobby Orr
  • Jason York
  • Joe Nieuwendyk
  • Joe Sakic
  • Doug Gilmour
  • Paul Coffey
  • Adam Oates
  • Jonathan Toews
  • Cody Hodgson

 

 



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